Mega Blowout Sale

2005 remaster, with bonus tracks, research by Mark Powell and packaging by Phil Smee! John Martyn started his career as a fairly straight-forward folkie, but he very rapidly began to incorporate jazz influences and much more along with his acoustic and device-laden acoustic guitar and distinctive and wonderful vocals. There are times when the echo-plex drenched acoustic mixes with his vocals in an almost over-powering way. This is from 1971 and includes Danny Thompson, Tony Reeves, Roger Powell, Richard...

A late-period classic and one of the last of his truly great ones.

"Following a short layoff, John Martyn returned with his 12th record (including two with wife Beverley and a best-of collection), Grace & Danger. The album, which finds Martyn fronting a tight quartet featuring Phil Collins on drums and backing vocals, paints a stark, painful portrait of Martyn and Beverley's crumbling marriage. Close friend and Island Records president Chris Blackwell reportedly found the songs so personal and...

"These are the complete sessions that John Martyn recorded for two BBC disc jockeys between 1973 and 1978, and though a few have seen release elsewhere before, the majority are new to CD and a welcome addition to the Martyn canon. There's plenty of electric improvisation here, including "Devil Got My Woman" (really "I'd Rather Be the Devil") and "Inside" (better known as "Inside Out"), which get extensive workouts, and there's a 1978 take on "Small Hours" that ends the disc on a lovely, aching note. In...

Disc 1 is the very well known (and very, very great) album John made with backing by Danny Thompson (double bass) and John Stevens (yes, the famous free-jazz/free-music drummer), recorded 2/75 and which he self-released himself in a limited edition shortly after!
Interestingly enough, even though there is a deluxe edition of this album on Island, it turns out that the original album was NOT all taken from the Leeds concert and this version is the only version currently available of the original...

"Solid Air (whose title track was written for John Martyn's friend, songwriter Nick Drake) is one of the defining moments in British folk, in the same league as Fairport Convention's Liege & Lief, Richard & Linda Thompson's Shoot Out the Lights, and Michael Chapman's Rainmaker. Martyn stepped out of his comfort zone to record and produce it, including not only jazz and blues but rock and plenty of sound effects, and featuring Rhodes piano on some of its tracks, dismaying some fans while winning a ton...

2005 remaster, with bonus tracks, research by Mark Powell and packaging by Phil Smee! John Martyn started his career as a fairly straight-forward folkie, but he very rapidly began to incorporate jazz influences and much more along with his acoustic and...

2005 remaster, with bonus tracks, research by Mark Powell and packaging by Phil Smee! John Martyn started his career as a fairly straight-forward folkie, but he very rapidly began to incorporate jazz influences and much more along with his acoustic and...

2005 remaster, with bonus tracks, research by Mark Powell and packaging by Phil Smee! John Martyn started his career as a fairly straight-forward folkie, but he very rapidly began to incorporate jazz influences and jazz instrumentalists along with his ...

"Reissue of this Japanese early '70s performance group. The group's name is literally the icons for a "circle," "triangle" and "square," with "Maru Sankaku Shikaku" substituting as a translation for those images. Circle Triangle Square were a painted bunch of commune rockers and percussion tribe second to none, whose random bells, flute and remedial tea-tray flailings were still more like the Godz or Nihilist Spasm Band than the deep theta-space obliterations of Taj Mahal Travellers. Led by future....

Guitarist John McLaughlin has released a large number of really great albums during his career, but this is one of his best and one of my personal favorites. His 2nd solo album from 1970, this is his most psychedelic, with great guitarwork and some of...

This is a pretty great album, recorded in October 1972, when John was at his height with Mahavishnu, and Carlos was at his peak with Caravanserai and both were at their peak of wearing little white suits and sitting at the feet of Sri Chinmoy! It mixed...

"First official full length concert DVD by John McLaughlin. Guitarist John McLaughlin and the 4th Dimension featuring Gary Husband on keyboards and jungle kit, Mark Mondesir on drums and Dominique di Piazza on bass. This electrifying concert was...

Eight great 50s works to 1961! These cover the period from Jackie's emergence as a great hard-bopper into the beginning of his embrace of 'the new thing' and the uniquely his music he made after that. Phew.
McLean's Scene
New Soil
Swing, Swang, Swingin'
Capuchin Swing
Jackie's Bag
Bluesnik
Inta Somethin'
A Fickle Sonance...

This is one of the great free-bop, avant-leaning classics of the 60s from Blue Note. It's got great, GREAT tunes, an ace band and even an alternate take! Hugely recommended!
Jackie McLean-alto sax
Grachan Moncur III-trombone
Bobby Hutcherson-vibes
Eddie Khan-bass
Tony Williams-drums

"Legendary alto saxophonist Jackie McLean made dozens of records for Blue Note, and in my opinion "One Step Beyond" is his most adventurous effort and overall best album. And, it was until now..

“John Medeski's solo piano debut was a long time coming. Recorded for Sony Masterworks' revived Okeh imprint, it's a 41-minute showcase of a pianist we've not really encountered -- at least at this length -- before. At the suggestion of engineer and producer Henry Hirsch, Medeski cut this set using a seven-foot, 1925 French Gaveau piano. The instrument has a very different construct than the Steinways he usually plays. According to his liner essay, "The Gaveau responds to a more delicate, nuanced touch...

IF you ever felt the need to hear Jello Biafra cover Roxy Music's "In Every Dream Home A Heartache" and JG Thirwell cover Bowie's "Station To Station, both fronting the Melvins, well, then, you got off at the right stop!

"Normally, when a long-running band releases an album of covers, it's seen as the band just cutting loose, mixing it up, and having a little fun with someone else's songs for a change. The Melvins, however, are not a band that anyone would ever accuse of kowtowing to anyone's...

"When the Melvins teamed up with Big Business, it felt like they were, in effect, creating a sort of "Melvins squared." Jared Warren and Coady Willis seemed to be a perfect fit with Crover and Osborne, with the two pairs doubling up to create what...

"Much too often, late career live albums don't capture the spirit of a band. This is far from the case with the Melvins. Recorded live, presumably while touring somewhere in 2008 (hard to be sure, since, like the Alive at the F*cker Club venue, the...

"At this point in the Melvins career, they can do pretty much whatever. Even if this means starting an album with a call-and-response track in the style of Adam Ant, complete with military cadence vocals and an extended drum solo. At the same time...

Low key but very charming blues recording of Memphis Slim (piano and vocals ) and the one of the greatest blues songwriters ever, Willie Dixon (double bass and vocals), recorded in a club in Paris in 1962, with gentle backing by drummer Philippe...

Meretrio is a power trio of guitar, bass and drums from Brasil. They decided to use the form of the power trio to explore jazz with influences of samba and bossa nova, among other influences. The Projeto Meretrio is their second CD and far superior...

"Imaginary Day was shot live at the Mountain Winery in Saratoga, California in 1998. Performing 6 songs off the at the time newly released "Imaginary Day" album, the Pat Metheny Group pushes the boundaries of jazz, bringing the viewer on a journey to the deepest parts of the mind and soul."

"This filmed 1998 concert is only available on DVD as near as I can determine. The concert features 11 numbers, all but two written by Metheny and his regular collaborator and keyboard artist Lyle Mays...

... don't miss the "Orchestrion in the Studio" extra. On this, one is able to actually see the working of the robot instruments much more clearly than in the main program...

"Barry Miles is an overlooked jazz/fusion keyboardist that made some great albums in the 70s. He became a session player and more or less lapsed into obscurity. Some of his discs have been reissued in Japan but Sky Train is one of his better releases and finds itself on a US release.

Recorded in 1976, it finds Miles playing a variety of keyboards. In particular he demonstrates incredible proficiency on Mini-Moog. His musical foil is alto saxist Eric Kloss. Guitarist Vic Jurist, bassist Anthony...

Guitarist Phil Miller is - of course - one of the living personifications of the Canterbury scene, having been in Matching Mole, National Health, Hatfield and the North and many other excellent, related ensembles and projects. This 1988 album was...

In Cahoots - one of the last electric jazz/jazz-rock bands standing with any ties to the 'Canterbury scene' - now features Phil Miller-guitar, Fred Baker-bass, Mark Fletcher-drums, Peter Lemer-keyboards, Simon Finch-trumpet, Simon Picard-sax, with...

Guitarist Phil Miller is - of course - one of the living personifications of the Canterbury scene, having been in Matching Mole, National Health, Hatfield and the North and many other excellent, related ensembles and projects.

This live...

"Lucky Millinder - like Tiny Bradshaw - was a contemporary of Cab Calloway in the swing 1930s (who was managed, or should we say "owned" at one point by Al Capone) who turned to R&B in the 1940s/50s. His band was famous for being the breeding ground ...

"Following his relentless creativity in the 1950s and '60s, Charles Mingus was slowing down by the early '70s, having combated financial hardship and health issues in recent years. In 1971 he served as the Slee Professor of Music at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and performed intermittently. This superb set was taped at Boston's Jazz Workshop that October, for broadcast on WBCN-FM, and captures him in fiery form, backed by John Foster (piano), Joe Gardner (trumpet), Hamiet "Bunny" Bluiett...

"Unlike Bob Mintzer's '80s offerings on Cheetah (Source and Papa Lips), the band used on this session is a quartet made up of star talent: bassist Eddie Gómez, the elegant pianist Steve Kuhn, and drummer Steve Gadd. On first glance it might appear that Gadd is out of place among these more subtle members of the rhythm section. Being a consummate professional as a studio musician, Gadd is an excellent jazz drummer adding grace, subtlety and tension to a very sophisticated rhythm section...

Was there a greater 'singer/songwriter' that emerged in the 60s and who went on to even greater heights in the 70s and still was making great work into the 00s? I don't think so and this 1974 album, which was both an artistic peak as well as a...

"A live concert conducted at the Wells Fargo Theatre in Los Angeles. The audience was comprised of 200 ardent fans on a invitation basis only. The set list includes twelve musical numbers and one talk track totaling seventy-two minutes of playing time. The (radio broadcast)... sound quality [is] exceptional. The audience/artist chemistry throughout the concert elevates the quality of Joni's performance. The audience members are equally welcoming, friendly and appreciative whether the artist is singing or..

Prime period, previously unreleased radio broadcast concert by The Modern Jazz Quartet.
1. The Queen's Fancy
2. Bess, Oh Where's My Bess?
3. Three Windows
4. God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen
5. Bluesology
6. A Night in Tunesia
7. Fontessa
8. One Never Knows
9. Woody'n You
10. 2 Degrees East 3 Degrees West
11. Venice
12. The Golden Striker

The good: This presents Monk and his post Coltrane quartet of Charlie Rouse, Ahmed Abdul-Malik and Roy Haynes in a performance from the Five Spot in 1958, several years before he was so well documented. Additionally, you get to hear Baroness Nica's voice introducing him.

The bad: These recordings were made with a portable reel-to-reel tape recorder, utilizing a single microphone. There is background noise and table chatter. It's all audible, but hardly 'hi-fi'.

Live, professional (radio?) recordings by Monk and his long-standing group (Charlie Rouse, Butch Warren, Ben Riley), recorded in Paris in 1964.

Live, professional (radio?) recordings by Monk and his long-standing group (Charlie Rouse, Butch Warren, Ben Riley), recorded in Paris in 1964.

"The Thelonious Monk Quartet of 1964 (comprised of the pianist-composer, tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse, bassist Larry Gales, and drummer Ben Riley) is well featured on this excellent set which is augmented by two "new" alternate takes...

"Alternate takes on a Monk solo LP are a revelation, and this reissue of his 1965 Columbia solo LP is packed with seven of them, plus an additional bonus track!"

"The mystery and haunting angular beauty of Thelonious Monk's unadorned keyboard sides are the focus of Solo Monk. As if holding the history of jazz in his hands, Monk's solo recordings and performances from every phase of his career remain pure."-All Music Guide

"The Transformer is a 2-disc set (totaling 107 minutes) of Thelonious Monk developing his unique take on a single jazz standard, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You." The primary source is practice tapes recorded at Monk's home in early 1957, using a small reel-to-reel with a single (mono) microphone. Remastered by Rudy Van Gelder, these historical recordings provide some insight into Monk's methodical approach. In lieu of complete performances, the 79 minutes of practice material feature Monk often...

Great, nearly 60 year old document in excellent sound of the barely recorded Thelonious Monk Quartet from the period when it featured John Coltrane, who was just beginning his musical rise to the top echelon of players here. Recommended for cognoscenti!..

"What happens when the most gifted keyboard player in rock music (or classical music, for that matter) decides to return to his guitar-playing days and dust off his Fender Strat and Gibson SG? The progressive music faithful receive 80 minutes of...

Filmed on the last night of their one-time-only run of 10 performances in July, 2014.

"Monty Python are flying again for a final reunion, well, sort of. This hugely anticipated live show took place on June 20th 2014 at the O2 Arena in London. At a combined age of just 357, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin once again take to the stage and perform some Monty Python's greatest hits with modern, topical, Pythonesque twists."

"Python from 1969 to 1983: Monty Python Sings is a very well-done album. Some songs, like Always Look on the Bright Side of Life, were from Monty Python movies. Others, such as Lumberjack Song, were from their TV show, Monty Python's Flying Circus. And some, such as Medical Love Song, Finland Finland, Never Be Rude to an Arab, and I'm So Worried, were from Python comedy albums, such as Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album. This album covers all groups of Monty Python fans; fans of Flying Circus...

“The Moody Blues' first real attempt at a harder rock sound still has some psychedelic elements, but they're achieved with an overall leaner studio sound. The group was trying to take stock of itself at this time, and came up with some surprisingly strong, lean numbers (Michael Pinder's Mellotron is surprisingly restrained until the final number, "The Balance"), which also embraced politics for the first time ("Question" seemed to display the dislocation that a lot of younger listeners were feeling...

“Due to interpersonal strife, the Moody Blues called it quits between 1972's Seventh Sojourn and 1978's Octave. Presumably attempting to satiate hungry Moodies fans, Threshold released this vintage concert recording from a 1969 Royal Albert Hall show. The band was young and at the peak of its popularity, and they sound full of promise and ambition. Most of the songs come from their classic concept album Days of Future Passed and its two successors. Having not yet settled into a more comfortable ballad...

“This album marked the formal debut of the psychedelic-era Moody Blues; though they'd made a pair of singles featuring new (as of 1966) members Justin Hayward and John Lodge, Days of Future Passed was a lot bolder and more ambitious. What surprises first-time listeners -- and delighted them at the time -- is the degree to which the group shares the spotlight with the London Festival Orchestra without compromising their sound or getting lost in the lush mix of sounds. That's mostly because they came to...

“The best-realized of their classic albums, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour was also the last of the group's albums for almost a decade to be done under reasonably happy and satisfying circumstances -- for the last time with this lineup, they went into the studio with a reasonably full song bag and a lot of ambition and brought both as far as time would allow, across close to four months (interrupted by a tour of the United States right in the middle). Virtually everywhere you listen on this record, the...

“In Search of the Lost Chord is the album on which the Moody Blues discovered drugs and mysticism as a basis for songwriting and came up with a compelling psychedelic creation, filled with songs about Timothy Leary and the astral plane and other psychedelic-era concerns. They dumped the orchestra this time out in favor of Mike Pinder's Mellotron, which was a more than adequate substitute, and the rest of the band joined in with flutes, sitar, tablas, and cellos, the playing of which was mostly learned on...

One of the earliest symphonic rock bands, The Moody Blues were touring with their mellotron and their flutes and acoustic guitars from 1967.
Depending on your point of view, you will either be thrilled by the fact that this reasonably well recorded performance of the band in their orchestral, original prime exists in reasonably professional quality for a gigantic outdoors festival in 1970 or you will find it lacking in sonics.
Which is probably why we can offer it for so little money!....

“On the Threshold of a Dream was the first album that the Moody Blues had a chance to record and prepare in a situation of relative calm, without juggling tour schedules and stealing time in the studio between gigs -- indeed, it was a product of what were almost ideal circumstances, though it might not have seemed that way to some observers. The Moodies had mostly exhausted the best parts of the song bag from which their two preceding albums, Days of Future Passed and In Search of the Lost Chord, had...