Mega Blowout Sale

James Williams-piano
Donald Harrison-alto sax
Ron Carter-bass
Billy Cobham-drums
Really a great acoustic band assembled by BC for this one!

"With a compelling mixture of enduring standards and imaginative originals, this all-star quartet establishes itself, in Billy Cobham's words, ''as a uniquely unified musical force.'' Billy considers jazz musicians to be the most flexible instrumentalists in the Western hemisphere and says, To witness that musical flexibility, one just has t

"Having made landmark recordings with Miles Davis, formed pioneering fusion bands Dreams and Mahavishnu Orchestra, and made several fine solo albums, by 1978 Billy Cobham was firmly established as one of the world's leading jazz-rock drummers. This superb set was taped for radio broadcast by WXRT-FM at Park West, Chicago, Illinois, on March 4, 1978, and finds him supported by his recently formed Magic Band, consisting of Charles Singleton (sax, reeds, guitar), Ray Mouton (guitar), Alvin Batiste...

"Billy Cobham's multicultural band strengthens its reputation as an exciting fusion group, impressing with powerful jazz-rock elements as well as more intimate, ethnic-colored sounds. The mix, done in Peter Gabriel's Real World studios, has undoubtedly contributed to the powerful global appeal of this new production."

"Billy Cobham's first fusion recording for IN+OUT, available for the first time in the US! Culture Mix is a celebration of the universality of jazz. This is a dynamic and refreshingly original combo, whose members each hail from a different country, and the standard of musicianship and imaginative improvisation is at the highest level. Features 10 refreshingly conceived original compositions, played with intense commitment and flair. A must-have for all Billy Cobham fans."

With Jon Hiseman, Chris Farlowe, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Clem Clempson, Dave Greenslade and Mark Clarke.

"In spite of Jon Hiseman's reluctance to reform Colosseum, in the early nineties, the spate of band reissues generated new interest in the band. Whilst on tour in Germany, Hiseman was encouraged to rethink, & a debut reunion concert was arranged in October, 1994."

Jon Hiseman-drums
Clem Clempson-guitar / vocals
Dick Heckstall-Smith-saxes
Dave Greenslade-keyboard / vibes
Chris Farlowe-vocals

"Despite many requests from fans and promoters over the last 20 years, I never seriously considered reforming the original Colosseum. But the release of all the albums on CD in the early 90's was very successful and generated a lot of new interest in the band. When Dave, Dick, Clem and Chris ganged up on me in 1993 it became clear that there was no...

Colour Haze are a great, mostly instrumental, German guitar/bass/drums psychedelic trio. This is a reissue of the group's long out of print first album, originally released in 2001. The sound here is rawer and more guitar-y psychedelic than later, but...

A iconic mid 60s John Coltrane album that deserves every singe gram of eminence it has gained in 55 years and counting. If you don't own it, this is a must. Period.

"One of the most important records ever made, John Coltrane's A Love Supreme was his pinnacle studio outing, that at once compiled all of the innovations from his past, spoke to the current of deep spirituality that liberated him from addictions to drugs and alcohol, and glimpsed at the future innovations of his final two and a half...

“You don't have to be a jazz fan at all to adore this (I'm not); if you're into Mission of Burma, The Stooges, or any other music that pins the intensity level to 10 and leaves it there, you have to give this a try. Your life may change, too.”-Eric Van

When I was a kid, trying to teach myself about ‘avant garde music’, one of the things I did was check out the local library.
The Wheaton Library had a number of ‘modern’ recordings (vinyl records – this was 1971-1972) that I checked out...

John Coltrane – soprano and tenor sax
Eric Dolphy – alto saxophone, flute (tracks 1-3)
McCoy Tyner – piano
Jimmy Garrison – bass
Elvin Jones – drums

CLASSIC 40’ broadcast from Birdland in NYC with Dolphy from February 10, 1962 and a bonus 10’ track without Eric from June 2.
Quite good sound for what this is, and exquisite music; you can never have too much Eric Dolphy in your life and the rest of the band comes a very close second!

“Recorded live on Coltrane's only Japanese tour in July 1966 at two Tokyo venues, Shinjuku Kosei Nenkin Hall and Sankei Hall, it is taken from mono radio broadcasts. It is notable for the presence of alto saxophone, played both by Coltrane and Sanders. By this point in his career, Coltrane was firmly enmeshed into the avant-garde style of Jazz. Sanders, who was an innovator of Free Jazz, influenced Coltrane's playing through his technical use of over-blowing and fierce vibrations of the reed, and this...

"John Coltrane's Crescent from the spring of 1964 is an epic album, showing his meditative side that would serve as a perfect prelude to his immortal work A Love Supreme. His finest quartet with McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison, and Elvin Jones supports the somewhat softer side of Coltrane, and while not completely in ballad style, the focus and accessible tone of this recording work wonders for anyone willing to sit back and let this music enrich and wash over you. While not quite at the "sheets of sound"...

Fine compilation of his Atlantic work; I mean, he deserves a 5 CD box, but if you want to hear a good sampling of his 1959-1962 era work, this is a fine set....

“This set documents the four-night stand by John Coltrane (sax) and his quintet at the Village Vanguard in New York City, November 1 -- 5, 1961.
Coltrane is accompanied by an all-star ensemble of Eric Dolphy (alto sax/bass clarinet), Garvin Bushell (oboe/contrabassoon), Ahmed Abdul-Malik (oud), McCoy Tyner (piano), Jimmy Garrison (bass), Reggie Workman (bass), Elvin Jones (drums), and Roy Haynes (drums). Their presence is as equally vital as Coltrane's -- inspiring as well as informing the....

Late & great period 'Trane, recorded May 1966 and featuring Pharoah Sanders, Alice Coltrane, Jimmy Garrison and Rashid Ali on two side length tracks.

"Now this was a daring project. By 1966, the once controversial November 1961 Village Vanguard sets, featuring a then-new Coltrane quartet along with Eric Dolphy, were Coltrane canon, a place of beginnings, a point where Coltrane transcended into his "new thing" and let the world know what kind of sounds he was working on (this is best heard in.....

“Trane's two blazing performances at Newport in 1963 and 1965 have now been reissued onto one bargain CD! The 1963 performance, even though it featured Roy Haynes on drums instead of regular Elvin Jones, has long been counted among Coltrane's most fiery performances; it appears here with an unreleased extended version of Impressions. Jones is back behind the kit for the 1965 performance, which consists of just two tracks, One Down, One Up and My Favorite Things. Transforming music from a great artist.”

“Condemned by many critics as John Coltrane's worst album, Om suffers only in comparison to the great works that preceded it. Also issued in 1965, Ascension had stunned the jazz world with the blunt force of its innovation -- a swirling maelstrom of noise, it was an answer to the challenge that had been posed by Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz several years earlier. For all the sonic assault that Pharoah Sanders and Coltrane mustered up on Ascension, however, it contained some surprisingly clear solos and...

"While I've owned all of John Coltrane's Atlantic and Impulse recordings for going on 15 years, it is only recently that I've sought to complete my collection of his various albums on the Prestige label, many of which have been recently remastered...

"This is the long o.o.p. complete concert at Stefaniensall, Graz, Austria, November 28, 1962. It features the "classic" quartet of Coltrane, Tyner, Garrison, and Jones playing well known favorites like "Bye Bye Blackbird", "The Inchworm", "Mr. P.C." (a nice version from the entire band), "I Want To Talk About You" (with some good Coltrane solos), "Impressions", and (with some lovely lyrical passages from Coltrane) "My Favorite Things". Also here are "Every Time We Say Goodbye", and the rarely heard...

“Digitally remastered edition of this posthumous 1970 album from the Jazz legend. The album was recorded on June 10 and June 16, 1965. As its title indicates, Transition was a bridge between classic quartet recordings like A Love Supreme and the more experimental works of Coltrane's last years.“

Excellent release by Ravi (sax) and band; Luis Perdomo-piano, Drew Gress-bass, EJ Strickland-drums.
Is he his father reincarnated? Is he breaking ground the same way his father did? The answer to both of these questions is no, but he is a fine player and this is a fine, contemporary jazz album; nicely recorded and superbly played with a lot of passion.

"On his fourth studio effort, saxophonist Ravi Coltrane charts a softly expansive, reverently adventurous course that by no means shatters...

"Bill Connors will always be best known for being the original guitarist with Chick Corea's Return to Forever, preceding Al DiMeola. After making one classic album (Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy), Connors left RtF and has had a lower profile ever since, spending some time exploring acoustic guitar.

On 2004's Return, Connors is back on electric guitar but playing post-bop jazz rather than fusion and with a tone closer to Kenny Burrell than to DiMeola. His nine originals sometimes have catchy grooves..

"Not only is this one of the greatest live soul albums ever released, it also reveals a rougher, rawer, and more immediate side to Sam Cooke that his singles only hinted at, good as they were. Working with a merged band that included guitarist Cliff White and drummer Albert "June" Gardner from Cooke's regular touring outfit and saxophonist King Curtis and his band, Cooke brings a gospel fervor to these whirlwind versions, which are fiery, emotionally direct, and hit with uncommon power. Every track...

Incredible, atmospheric, fantastically beautiful, animated film. Highly recommended, but not for kids!

"A dark and creepy film about family relationships directed by Henry Selick of Nightmare Before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach fame, Coraline is based on the haunting book Coraline by Neil Gaiman. Coraline is a teenager who has just moved to an old house in the middle of nowhere with her writer parents and she is bored, bored, bored. Her only companions are an annoyingly talkative boy...

Duets for piano and banjo may not seem all that exciting, but when you are dealing with genre-breaking virtuoso musicians like Corea and Fleck, the instruments used by them are really rather irrelevant; what’s important is their huge imagination and abilities!

"The sophomore effort from the extraordinary drummer Sebastiaan Cornelissen featuring an all-star lineup - guitarists Alex Machacek, Mike Otram, Susan Weinert, Richard Hallebeek; keyboardists Gary Husband, Scott Kinsey, and Steve Hunt; and bassists...

This is two solo albums by the ex-Stranglers guitarist and singer, only one of which you will most likely care about! But what a crazy album it is.
‘Nosferatu’ dates from 1979 and was a completely unexpected collaboration with Captain Beefheart drummer Robert Williams. Also featured are the Mothersbaugh brothers from Devo and Ian Underwood from The Mothers Of Invention!
It’s a pretty weird & experimental album for its time, and in 1979, was about the coolest, artiest thing out there, and...

“Fusion died sometime in the early 1980's; I cried at the funeral. Fortunately, that didn't stop Larry Coryell, Tom Coster, and Steve Smith from digging it up, shocking it back to life, sticking it behind the wheel of a '74 Trans Am H/O, and sending it screaming through the bad part of town. In the humble opinion of this reviewer, this could be the greatest album of all time -- okay, okay, Kenny G fans might take issue with that statement, but if you like fast and furious fusion guitar (complete with...

This is a really good collaboration from hugely talented folks who you would not expect to work together, but, actually, if you think about it, make total sense to work together.

"Musicians separated by age, style, and demographic, Elvis Costello and the Roots are nevertheless natural collaborators bound by wide taste, insatiable appetite, and fathomless record collections. This is particularly true of Roots drummer/de facto bandleader ?uestlove, the musical omnivore who is the band's most...

2008 solo album by the founder and leader of The Strawbs. This is a very good album of folk-rock that sounds an awful lot like the Strawbs.

Cherry Red is delighted to announce the first release for the rejuvenated Turpentine Records, the label founded by the late singer-songwriter/author/artist Kevin Coyne. Nobody Dies In Dreamland is a collection of songs recorded in 1972, prior to the...

Situated on the latter side of the progressive decade, Crack The Sky managed to escape wider attention in the 1970s thanks to a series of ill-managed mishaps. The release of their 1976 album Animal Notes would suffer the same fate as its predecessor gaining critical approval, but poor sales. Meanwhile, the band would amass a loyal following, sharing bills with the likes of Supertramp, ELO, Rush, Foreigner, Boston, Zappa and Be-Bop Deluxe.
Their legendary appearance in Long Island in 1976 provides a...

The entire output (two albums) that were originally released on the Vertigo Swirl label, digitally remastered for the first time from the master tapes. A 5 piece of Angus Cullen-vocals, John Heyworth-guitar, Peter Jennings-keyboards Kevin McCarthy...

More roots of Brit-jazz here.
"Digitally remastered reissue of this 1961 album from the jazz drummer. Whole Lotta Tony was recorded and released in 1961 on Ember, and credited to Tony Crombie & His Friends. Drummer Crombie's CV to date had...

Beppe Crovella-Mellotron, Fender Rhodes Stage 73 electric piano, Wurlitzer E200 electric piano, Hohner electric piano, Hohner Clavinet D6, Rösler Grand Piano, Hammond Organ M102, Farifsa Professional (neither analog or digital synthesizers, or other digital keyboards were used on this recording).

"...Beppe Crovella (Arti e Mestieri) delivers a heartfelt and long-overdue appreciation of one of the defining voices of the jazz-rock idiom, Soft Machine keyboard player and composer Mike Ratledge...

So, I saw this young band from Chicago at a house concert a couple of weeks ago. They were very good and very cool and the show I saw was the 1st show of a 2 month tour all the way across the USA and back.

They don't sound anything like it...

Lorraine Bailey – vocals, keys, alto saxophone, flute, synth bass
Jack Bouboushian – vocals, guitar, organ, microphone
Bill Miller – drum kit, percussion
Matt Puhr – bass

Crown Larks are an excellent Chicago band who play a cool unique progressive rock with heavy psych influences. I stumbled upon them a couple of years ago and they impressed and I was a instant convert!

"...demonstrates a learned appreciation for the city’s recent underground musical history (particularly th

Lorraine Bailey – vocals, keys, alto saxophone, flute, synth bass
Jack Bouboushian – vocals, guitar, organ, microphone
Bill Miller – drum kit, percussion
Matt Puhr – bass

Crown Larks are an excellent Chicago band who play a cool unique progressive rock with heavy psych influences. I stumbled upon them a couple of years ago and they impressed and I was a instant convert!

"...demonstrates a learned appreciation for the city’s recent underground musical history (particularly th

"Inspired by Haitian vaudou musicians’ capacity to make intensely powerful music with almost no technology, William Bennett first deployed his obscure collection of percussion instruments on the classic 'Wriggle Like A Fucking Eel' 12”. The name is derived from the song 'Cut Hands Has The Solution' by Whitehouse."

"Always on the fringes of music, the eccentric William Bennett invented the dreaded genre known as "power electronics" when he formed the provocative group Whitehouse, plus, he thrills...

These are Ivor's very first recordings from the late 50's and early 60's, reissued for the very first time. 28 tracks of stories, songs and prose. Has a nice 12 page booklet of photos and notes by Mark Powell, who also oversaw this reissue.

"Out of all the bizarre performers championed by John Peel, Ivor Cutler stands as one of the most curious and endearing. To a neophyte, his work may not, initially, seem that noteworthy. He reads stories and poems -- there is little distinction between the...

"Link Davis was probably the foremost Cajun fiddler of his generation. He not only excelled in the old timely tradition he was raised in, but was a hit artist in the Jazz influenced western swing field. He certainly prefigured what was to become...

One of many greats by Miles from the mid 70s, this has tons of totally slaying Johnny McLaughlin all over it. Totally slaying everybody, really. Ands if you love the Mahavishnu Orchestra like I do, hearing him and Cobham killing it a full year earlier will make you happy. If you don't already have this, you NEED this.

"None of Miles Davis' recordings has been more shrouded in mystery than Jack Johnson, yet none has better fulfilled Davis' promise that he could form the "greatest rock band you...

IMO, this is the last really good Miles Davis album and it followed a number of not very good ones and was followed by more not very good ones. Of course the label sat on it for years before it finally came out. Is it unbelivably brilliant? No, but...


This album rather gently began the electric period of Miles' career. Herbie is on half the tracks playing electric piano, while Chick is on the other half on electric piano. 1968 and you can early the earliest traces of rock and funk in his music here....

"...Davis, probably a bit bored by some of his repertoire and energized by the teenage Tony Williams' drumming, performed many of his standards at an increasingly faster pace as time went on. These versions of "So What," "Walkin'," "Four," "Joshua,"...

While they last, this is over 40% off the regular price!

The complete KPFA-FM radio broadcast of Miles Davis's performance at the Fillmore West on October 15, 1970.

Miles Davis: trumpet; Gary Bartz: soprano and alto saxophones; Keith...

Tremendous price on two albums of (mostly live) astonishment. This album was (mostly) recorded live at Washington DC's Cellar Door on the one night (October 19, 1970) that John McLaughlin came down from NYC to join the regular group of Miles, Keith Jarrett, Gary Bartz, Michael Henderson, Jack DeJohnette and Airto Moreira. Too bad I was only 12 at the time, or I would have mosey'd down there too.
With the posthumous release of all of the shows in the "Cellar Door" box, I have read a lot of reviews...

"The cover image alone for this 1968 release speaks loudly and clearly of something different: it looks like some weird rock record. And while it's not exactly that, Miles in the Sky hints loudly at something new, an upstart sound that would upset jazz...

"What is immedately noticeable upon listening to Miles Davis' classic first -- and only -- album with his original sextet is how deep the blues presence is on it. Though it's true that the album's title cut is rightfully credited with introducing modalism into jazz, and defining Davis' music for years to come, it is the sole selection of its kind on the record. The rest is all blues in any flavor you wish you call your own. For starters, there's the steaming bebop blues of "Dr. Jackle," recorded in 1955....