Mega Blowout Sale

One of many greats by Miles from the mid 70s, this has tons of totally slaying Johnny McLaughlin all over it. Totally slaying everybody, really. Ands if you love the Mahavishnu Orchestra like I do, hearing him and Cobham killing it a full year earlier will make you happy. If you don't already have this, you NEED this.

"None of Miles Davis' recordings has been more shrouded in mystery than Jack Johnson, yet none has better fulfilled Davis' promise that he could form the "greatest rock band you...

IMO, this is the last really good Miles Davis album and it followed a number of not very good ones and was followed by more not very good ones. Of course the label sat on it for years before it finally came out. Is it unbelivably brilliant? No, but...


This album rather gently began the electric period of Miles' career. Herbie is on half the tracks playing electric piano, while Chick is on the other half on electric piano. 1968 and you can early the earliest traces of rock and funk in his music here....

"...Davis, probably a bit bored by some of his repertoire and energized by the teenage Tony Williams' drumming, performed many of his standards at an increasingly faster pace as time went on. These versions of "So What," "Walkin'," "Four," "Joshua,"...

While they last, this is over 40% off the regular price!

The complete KPFA-FM radio broadcast of Miles Davis's performance at the Fillmore West on October 15, 1970.

Miles Davis: trumpet; Gary Bartz: soprano and alto saxophones; Keith...

"The cover image alone for this 1968 release speaks loudly and clearly of something different: it looks like some weird rock record. And while it's not exactly that, Miles in the Sky hints loudly at something new, an upstart sound that would upset jazz...

"What is immedately noticeable upon listening to Miles Davis' classic first -- and only -- album with his original sextet is how deep the blues presence is on it. Though it's true that the album's title cut is rightfully credited with introducing modalism into jazz, and defining Davis' music for years to come, it is the sole selection of its kind on the record. The rest is all blues in any flavor you wish you call your own. For starters, there's the steaming bebop blues of "Dr. Jackle," recorded in 1955....

"Miles' quintet (with George Coleman, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams) was a band for the ages, one that performed with an incandescent beauty remarkable even for them on February 12, 1964 at Lincoln Center. Their explorations of...

"Nefertiti, one of 1967's most interesting collections of music, is a landmark album and unquestionably one of the finest efforts by Miles and his superior cast of players. The album is a rarity for the group in a few ways- Miles does not contirubte a...

Of all the great, crazy-ass albums Miles released in his drug-addled but musically brilliant 1970s period, there was nothing as crazy or as utterly confoundingly brilliant as On The Corner. Completely inspired by Sly and the Family Stone and...

"In 1963, Miles Davis was at a transitional point in his career, without a regular group and wondering what his future musical direction would be. At the time he recorded the music heard on this CD, he was in the process of forming a new band, as can...

"In a very short time, this has quickly become one of my favorite Miles Davis CD's. This is unexpected in that this CD is from a time when Miles was transitioning band members without a whole lot of stability. The album has...

"May 1967 was the beginning of an amazing burst of studio creativity for Miles Davis; the first recordings in that burst are on this album. Sorcerer is even darker and moodier than its predecessor, Miles Smiles. (And even for a Miles Davis album...

“Part of the Heroes of the Blues series. The only true cross-licensed best-of package for the Rev. Gary Davis. A complete complete career retrospective, covering all periods of his career and various record labels. Digitally re-mastered. Cover art by R. Crumb.
In the 1920s, the prime of life, the Reverend Gary Davis was one of the two most renowned East Coast ragtime guitar players. Davis was partially blind at birth, and lost what little sight he had before he was an adult. Davis began playing at...

With Alex Maguire, Mark Sanders, Paul Dunmall, Simon Picard, Nick Evans, Jim Dvorak, Tony Bianco, Roberto Bellatella, Paul Rogers and others perform with Elton in duets, trios, quartets and quintets. Elton dusts off his Fender Rhodes chops for the 1st ...

...on Avant, the latest release from Britains Hux Records, Dean and Domancich join together as a duet for the first time. This live concert, while based on loose compositional sketches, is largely improvised, and it finds the pair operating without a s...

One of the most instantly recognizable voices of jazz of the 50s, 60s and beyond. She influenced lots of indie rock bands' female vocalists with her youthful style.

When Blossom Dearie first emerged as a solo artist she was already unique in many ways. Straightaway there was that voice - kittenish, intimate, coquettish and understated where so many other jazz divas were straining to belt out every song. With the fascinating 1957-58 albums 'Give Him the Ooh-la-la' and 'Once Upon a Summertime'...

Yes, that's her real name that she was born with. One of the most instantly recognizable voices of jazz of the 50s, 60s and beyond. She influenced lots of indie rock bands' female vocalists with her youthful style.

"It is hard to listen to Blossom Dearie and not fall in love with what she does. As a singer and pianist she is the very definition of charm, playful sophistication and understatement. When she sings, she distils the beauty and meaning of the lyric. No unnecessary adornment or displays o

The 2nd album by this English progressive folk-rock quintet, originally released on Mooncrest in 1974 makes a reappearance here in a deluxe edition. The band is Dave Bell-acoustic guitars, bass, vocals, Johnny Copin-acoustic guitars, piano, vocals...

NOTE: These are new copies, but they are not sealed and there is a sticker on the front of the 'paper wallet' holder, and there may be a small amount of bending with the paper wallet.

"The Decemberists belatedly embraced their indie pop sensibilities (or at very least their fondness for R.E.M.) on 2011's The King Is Dead, and were rewarded with a number one chart placing and the group's greatest commercial success to date, leading some to wonder if Colin Meloy and his bandmates were going...

Decibel were a legendary Mexican chamber/rock group with improvisational leanings who are probably best known for their very fine contribution to the excellent Recommended Records Sampler double album. This has a concert recording from Mexico City, May...

Begun as an Italian jazz rock band in the '70s featuring Fiorenzo Michele Bonansone (keyboards, cello, vocals), Marco Di Castri (guitar, sax), Furio Di Castri (bass) and Enrico Grosso (drums), Dedalus released two albums in 1973 and 1974.

In 2003 Bonansone decided to revive the spirit of Dedalus. Assisted by two classical musicians and a drummer with a thing for funky and African rhythms, he released "Nomos Apache Alpha" as the Bonansone Dedalus Group.

Although "Premio Darwin" declared..

One of the very greatest progressive hard rock bands (yes, progressive; just listen to Jon Lord's organ work!) of the early 70s! This is really where it all begins for them, imo.

"Led Zeppelin's fourth album, Black Sabbath's Paranoid, and Deep Purple's Machine Head have stood the test of time as the Holy Trinity of English hard rock and heavy metal, serving as the fundamental blueprints followed by virtually every heavy rock &...

One of the very greatest progressive hard rock bands (yes, progressive; just listen to Jon Lord's organ work!) of the early 70s, captured at their peak, live in Japan in 1972. Yes, this is where "Smoke On The Water" comes from, but honestly, it's one...

"Previously unheard material recorded on a quarter track tape machine at Alex Campbell’s home on August 5th 1967, captured just one month after Sandy recorded All Our Own Work. Unknown to exist for decades until a cassette turned up recently, Strawbs’...

Nicely done remaster with four bonus tracks.

"With Like an Old Fashioned Waltz, Sandy Denny expands on the more polished moments that her previous work, Sandy (1972), had suggested. The tone throughout most of the record is melancholy and personal, with gentle piano, rich strings, and barely a trace of her British folk roots. "Solo," one of her best songs, opens the album with a sense of apprehension and yearning, while cuts such as the beautifully vivid title track, the longing "At the End of...

"Rendezvous is Sandy Denny's last album, and although it's somewhat uneven in quality, I think it's fitting that this should be her last. The mood is stately, solemn and the sadness she can voice so well has a darker hue than usual.

On side one, the best tracks are the jazzy "Gold Dust" and the beautiful "One way donkey ride". Side two is the strongest side I think, starting off with the gorgeous "I'm a dreamer", followed by the masterpiece on this album, which is "All our days". I would have...

Nicely done remaster with four bonus tracks.

"Following the breakup of the short-lived Fotheringay, Sandy Denny returned with her first post-Fairport solo album, The North Star Grassman and the Ravens. Produced with ex-bandmate Richard Thompson and longtime engineer John Wood, who would go on to produce the bulk of Thompson's work with Linda Thompson, the record consists of eight evocative Denny originals, along with the traditional "Blackwaterside" and a pair of borrowed rockers. There's a...

"Paul Desmond's sessions away from the Dave Brubeck Quartet were always something special, and this greatly expanded reissue edition of Desmond Blue is no exception. By far the most interesting album that the alto saxophonist ever did with an orchestra...

"Now listeners can enter the heart of the Paul Desmond/Jim Hall sessions, a great quartet date with Gene Cherico manning the bass (Gene Wright deputizes on the title track) and MJQ drummer Connie Kay displaying other sides of his personality. Everyone...

Coming out of Akron, Ohio in 1977 with two huge-selling underground singles (Jocko Homo and Satisfaction), Devo quickly signed with Virgin and released their initial full length, which is was produced by Brian Eno and did a good job of capturing their ...

"Guitarist Al di Meola's second record as a leader is generally an explosive affair, although it does have a fair amount of variety. With Jan Hammer or Barry Miles on keyboards, electric bassist Anthony Jackson, drummer Lenny White (Steve Gadd takes...

"One of the guitar heroes of fusion, Al di Meola was just 22-years-old at the time of his debut as a leader but already a veteran of Chick Corea's Return to Forever. The complex pieces (which include the three-part "Suite-Golden Dawn," an acoustic duet...

"Talk about ambitious. This two-LP set finds guitarist Al di Meola performing with his quintet of the time (featuring keyboardist Philippe Saisse), with studio musicians, solo, in a reunion with pianist Chick Corea, singing a love song, and welcoming...

"After several years of delay, Sweden's avant garde rock band Diablo Swing Orchestra makes their long awaited return with their new and fourth album, Pacifisticuffs. Unusual title, yes, and exactly what you would expect from this band. On board with the band is new singer and pianist Kristin Evegard and new drummer Johan Norback.
The simple summary of Pacifisticuffs is that it's everything you would expect from Diablo Swing Orchestra. For the uninitiated, DSO twists diverse musical genres like rock..

"Following up the superb Elegant Gypsy was no mean feat, but Al di Meola gave it his best shot with the similarly styled Casino, released in 1978. Featuring a core band of Steve Gadd, Anthony Jackson, and Barry Miles (whom di Meola came up with before...

Lurking behind a rather goofy illustration of three dorky looking guys, one of whom sports a seriously deep moustache, is an extremely good album of jazz/jazz-rock from Brazil. The band is: Felix Wagner-piano, alto clarinet, vibes, percussion, flute...

Good (not great) radio broadcast sound.

"One of the most eclectic bands to emerge from the American South, the Dixie Dregs devised diverse instrumentals combining rock, jazz, bluegrass, country, and more. This release showcases the band's undisputed virtuosity.

Featuring remastered sound, this double CD contains the entire KWFM broadcast of the Dixie Dregs' 1978 performance at Lee Furr's studios in Tucson, Arizona."

Here’s something a little different and also very good and interesting: Endtroducing.... was possibly the first album ever released comprised solely of samples Shadow found by visiting record stores and buying old vinyl, which is reflected on the cover art.
He put it together using a very minimal amount of equipment (partially due to the fact that the technology wasn’t as advanced as now and partially due to choice) and went for a very moody, low-key sound.
On its own merits, it’s a good work and.

"A subtle, moody, rich and wide-ranging work, in which atmosphere, emotion and dramaturgy lead the ear far beyond music into a world of hints, evocations, anticipation and association and, in passing, reveal a complex metonymic language that, at a deep level, invokes that mostly unconscious lexicon of sound we have all absorbed collectively and subliminally in the course of a century of movie-going, television viewing, documentary recording and electroacoustic experimentation. Once sounds have been...

"Tod Dockstader and David Lee Myers are two pioneers of electronic music, but from very different epochs. Dockstader started working with optical sound in the 1950s, later working with vast Telefunken tape recorders that became so hot they had to be left overnight to cool down. His electronic soundscapes (Lunar Park and Apocalypse among them) are now being rediscovered and given the respect they deserve. Pond is his first new album-length piece since 1967.
David Lee Myers, on the other hand, made...

"The finest composer who ever worked in the medium of sounds assembled on tape"-OP

"The legendary collaboration between a leading American Musique Concrete composer and an instrumental ensemble directed by James Reichert where, for I think the first and to date only time, there was full integration of the written, played and manipulated sounds. The instrumental parts were derived from 'cells' of concrete sound and in turn were electronically transformed (in Robert Moog's then state of the art...

This is a solo album from the leader of Passport, which was released in 1983. Unlike Passport, it's a all keyboard / synthesizer album which fits right in with what Tangering Dream was doing at this time and can easily be compared to White Eagle! So, a surprise, but a very nice surprise!

"A rockin' and jumpin' overview of Fats' first half-a-dozen years as a recording star. It concentrates on the uptempo (and particularly the rarely compiled instrumental) side of Fats' early repertoire before his international success with the...

These 3 lengthy improvisations are wonderfully paced, characterised by an authoritative sense of purpose & direction. Doneda continues to extend the sonic capabilities of the soprano saxophone &...confirms his position as one of the most important & ex...

"The Doors returned to crunching, straightforward hard rock on Morrison Hotel, an album that, despite yielding no major hit singles, returned them to critical favor with hip listeners. An increasingly bluesy flavor began to color the songwriting and arrangements, especially on the party'n'booze anthem "Roadhouse Blues." Airy mysticism was still present on "Waiting for the Sun," "Queen of the Highway," and "Indian Summer"; "Ship of Fools" and "Land Ho!" struck effective balances between the hard rock...

"This Doors' album was probably one of their most ambitious when it was released in 1969. It features horns and strings, straying from the usual formula but delivering the classic hit "Touch Me.""

"The Doors' 1967 albums had raised expectations so high that their third effort was greeted as a major disappointment. With a few exceptions, the material was much mellower, and while this yielded some fine melodic ballad rock in "Love Street," "Wintertime Love," "Summer's Almost Gone," and "Yes, the River Knows," there was no denying that the songwriting was not as impressive as it had been on the first two records. On the other hand, there were first-rate tunes such as the spooky...